Author

Kevin Barnes

Issuing Body

Mississippi State University

Advisor

Bradshaw, Gary

Committee Member

Eakin, Deborah

Committee Member

Moss, Jarrod

Date of Degree

5-1-2020

Document Type

Graduate Thesis - Open Access

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Psychology

Abstract

Repeated testing produces superior recall (especially at a delay) compared to rereading, a phenomenon known as the testing effect. Three studies present evidence for a test question effect that benefits recall of information participants encounter when reading a test. After reading a two-page passage, participants either reread the passage or took fill-in-the-blank practice tests that contained additional information that was later tested. The same procedure was used for a different two-page prose passage as well. A large and unexpected benefit for information read on practice tests was observed. On the 48-hour delayed final test, recall of information reread on practice tests was superior to information reread in prose passages, a finding that is not predicted by current theories of the testing effect. Additionally, recall of information reread on practice tests did not differ significantly from tested information.

URI

https://hdl.handle.net/11668/16922

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