Advisor

McKinney, Cliff

Committee Member

Keeley, Jared W.

Committee Member

Armstrong, Kevin J.

Date of Degree

1-1-2013

Original embargo terms

MSU Only Indefinitely

Document Type

Graduate Thesis - Open Access

Major

Psychology

Degree Name

Master of Science

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Psychology

Abstract

Parenting practices have great influence over a child’s behavior. Specifically, parental involvement may protect children from developing problem behaviors during their development. A strong parent-child relationship may act as a preventative measure towards development of disruptive behavior into emerging adulthood (i.e., 18 to 25 years). The current study aimed to examine the effects of parenting practices and parental involvement on emerging adult outcomes. Results indicated that parental involvement and parenting styles were negatively correlated with disruptive behavior, parenting styles and parental involvement were positively correlated with one another, and females tended to perceive higher levels of involvement from mothers. In addition, it was found that parenting styles and disruptive behavior were accounted for through parental involvement. Child disclosure also was associated with lower levels of disruptive behavior, whereas parental solicitation was found to be associated with higher levels disruptive behavior.

URI

https://hdl.handle.net/11668/20614

Comments

Emerging Adulthood||Disruptive Behavior||Parental Involvement||Parenting

Available for download on Monday, May 15, 2113

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