Advisor

Nadorff, Michael R.

Committee Member

Jarosz, Andrew F.

Committee Member

Winer, Eric Samuel

Date of Degree

12-1-2019

Document Type

Graduate Thesis - Open Access

Major

Psychology

Degree Name

Master of Science

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Psychology

Abstract

Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States, with rates increasing over the past several decades. This study examined whether problem-solving performance differs in those with no suicide ideation or attempts compared to those with only suicide ideation and with those with a history of attempts. Results demonstrated that when accounting for depression, problem-solving accuracy was positively predictive for the suicidal ideation group. Furthermore, the suicidal ideation group solved more problems on average than both those with no history of suicidal thoughts and behaviors and the suicide attempt group. The current study was somewhat underpowered and therefore should be interpreted with caution. Additionally, this is the first study to use the problem-solving task when investigating suicide and the first to use the task in an online manner. The findings suggest some meaningful differences that will lay the groundwork for future investigations.

URI

https://hdl.handle.net/11668/16407

Comments

suicide||problem solving||remote associates test

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