Advisor

Dyer, Jamie L.

Committee Member

Mercer, Andrew E.

Committee Member

Cooke, William H.

Date of Degree

1-1-2012

Document Type

Graduate Thesis - Open Access

Major

Geosciences

Degree Name

Master of Science

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Geosciences

Abstract

One of the greatest hazards from hurricanes is the flooding due to storm surge. Emergency managers traditionally plan for storm surge by looking at the worst possible impact and design their plans accordingly. This is a safe course of action, but can also be a wasted expense if the worst case does not occur. Risk-based planning is a way to incorporate the likelihood or probability of an impact occurring into emergency planning. With respect to storm surge, though, there is very little information regarding probability of occurrence. This research uses data from a commonly accepted storm surge model, SLOSH from the National Weather Service, to develop probabilities of impact. The process and products are prototypes utilizing data from the 2007 SLOSH model run for the New Orleans basin. Products developed include a map of probability, probabilities of exceedance, and a list of model storms that generate surge at given locations.

URI

https://hdl.handle.net/11668/20527

Comments

climatology||risk||emergency management

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