Advisor

Atkinson, Theodore B.

Committee Member

Marsh, Kelly

Committee Member

West, Robert M.

Date of Degree

1-1-2019

Document Type

Graduate Thesis - Open Access

Degree Name

Master of Arts

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of English

Abstract

In the mid-twentieth century many critics considered Eudora Welty’s work regionalist, which limited the interpretation of its social and political implications. However, by the late 1980s there was a renewed dedication to examining the subtle social and political implications present in her fiction. In keeping with this critical trend, I examine Welty’s revisions to four stories in A Curtain of Green and Other Stories. Previous interpretations of “Clytie,” “Why I Live at the P.O.,” “A Memory,” and “A Curtain of Green” do not adequately address how the female protagonists of these stories challenge traditional expectations for women. I argue that Welty’s revisions provide fundamental support for the female protagonists so that they can challenge existing social order in covert ways.

URI

https://hdl.handle.net/11668/21041

Comments

southern women||gender||class||race||subversion||exposure||patriarchal systems||covert progression||transgression

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