Advisor

Bushby, Philip

Committee Member

Minnis, Richard

Committee Member

Jack, Skip

Date of Degree

8-1-2010

Document Type

Graduate Thesis - Open Access

Major

Veterinary Medical Science

Degree Name

Master of Science

College

College of Veterinary Medicine

Department

Department of Clinical Sciences

Abstract

The pet overpopulation problem is a multiactorial problem that many organizations such as animal shelters attempt to manage. Many studies have focused on the reasons animals are relinquished by their owners but few have also looked at the characteristics that may influence adoption. Identifying which characteristics that influence adoption may help shelters provide more detailed adoption programs based on their dog and cat profile. Increases in the number of dogs and cats entering animal shelters during the spring and summer month is a perception among shelter staff. Investigating the seasonal trends in the number of animals entering a shelter may help the facility prepare to provide additional space and resources. The focus of this study was to identify any seasonal variation in the number of dogs and cats entering animal shelters in Mississippi and to determine the characteristics of dogs and cats that influenced their adoption.

URI

https://hdl.handle.net/11668/15441

Comments

seasonal variation||adoption||animal shelters

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