Advisor

Jacquin, Kristine M.

Committee Member

Spirrison, Charles L.

Committee Member

Armstrong, Kevin J.

Date of Degree

1-1-2007

Document Type

Graduate Thesis - Open Access

Degree Name

Master of Science

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Psychology

Abstract

The present research examined the influence of military status, organizational climate type, gender, and attitudes toward sexual harassment on juror decisions in a sexual harassment trial. Military participants rated themselves as having more stereotypical masculine characteristics and they rated sexual harassment allegations more seriously. The permissive climate type elicited less serious allegation ratings. Females rated all climates as more permissive, found the defendant more liable, and chose more severe punishments. Tolerant attitudes toward sexual harassment predicted juror decisions for both ROTC and civilian mock jurors. The results highlight the need for further education about sexual harassment to reduce tolerant attitudes and permissive organizational climates, and to increase fairness in harassment trials.

URI

https://hdl.handle.net/11668/17829

Comments

jury decision-making||military||ROTC||sexual harassment

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