Advisor

Hagerman, Margaret Ann

Committee Member

Leap, Braden T.

Committee Member

Peterson, Lindsey

Committee Member

Hossfeld, Leslie H.

Date of Degree

5-1-2019

Document Type

Graduate Thesis - Open Access

Major

Sociology

Degree Name

Master of Science

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Sociology

Abstract

In this thesis, I explore how white producers of U.S. agriculture’s top commodity—cattle—understand participation in government farm programs. As such, the central research question guiding this research is: how do white Mississippi cattle producers portray their decisions to pursue (or not pursue) government farm programs? Specifically, I offer insights into how farmers reconcile tension between being independent/self-sufficient and accepting government subsidies. Using data from 289 hours of participant observation at agricultural events and 33 interviews with producers, I examine sociologically how these understandings of farm program participation relate to producers’ ideological notions of “success” and how race and gender shape these understandings.

URI

https://hdl.handle.net/11668/20933

Comments

whiteness||rural masculinity||farmers||ranchers||farm programs||agriculture||rural sociology

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