Title

The Effects of Dual Enrollment on an Institution: Student Persistence and Degree Attainment at the Community College

Issuing Body

Mississippi State University

Advisor

King, Stephanie B.

Committee Member

Fincher, Mark E.

Committee Member

Johnson, Susan Mitzy

Committee Member

Coats, Linda T.

Date of Degree

1-1-2018

Original embargo terms

Visible to MSU only for 3 years

Document Type

Dissertation - Open Access

Major

Community College Leadership

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

College

College of Education

Department

Department of Educational Leadership

Abstract

The overall college enrollment rates for young adults have increased over the last several years. While this is promising, a notable amount of students do not attain a degree. This scenario can create major consequences for the United States as global competitiveness requires a workforce that possesses a postsecondary degree. Dual enrollment is a program that has been seen to answer the need for more postsecondary graduates. Despite the robust literature that suggests the positive effects for students who participate in dual enrollment, limited research exists on the effects of dual enrollment on the institution. Therefore, this study attempted to fill the gap in the literature by examining the effects of dual enrollment on an institution. The independent variable was participation in dual enrollment and the dependent variables were persistence rates and degree completion. The population consisted of 5,251 first-time, full-time students in the Mississippi Community College System. Of this number, 741 had taken at least 1 dual enrollment course between the fall of 2010 and the spring of 2015, and 4,510 had no previous dual enrollment experience at all. A Chi-square test was used for both research questions. Results of the study indicate that there is a significant difference in persistence rates when comparing dual enrolled students to non-dual enrolled students. First-time, full-time students who had previous dual enrollment experience were more likely to maintain consistent enrollment (69%) at the community college than students who had no previous dual enrollment experience (45%). There is also a significant relationship between students attaining a degree in a timely manner when comparing dual enrolled students to non-dual enrolled students. First-time, full-time students who had previous dual enrollment experience were more likely to earn a degree in 3 years (61%) than students who did not participate in dual enrollment (35%). The effect size for both research questions was small. While the outcomes of this study are positive, it is imperative to continue to examine the effects of dual enrollment on an institution. Policy differences at each of the Mississippi community colleges could render different outcomes for the students and ultimately affect the institution.

URI

https://hdl.handle.net/11668/19554

Comments

dual enrollment||persistence rates||graduation rates||community college

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