Theses and Dissertations

Issuing Body

Mississippi State University

Advisor

McKinney, Clifford

Committee Member

Armstrong, Kevin J.

Committee Member

Jones, Torri

Date of Degree

5-4-2019

Original embargo terms

Worldwide

Document Type

Graduate Thesis - Open Access

Major

Psychology

Degree Name

Master of Science

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Psychology

Abstract

While Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common psychological disorders diagnosed during development, adult ADHD remains vastly under recognized and undertreated. In an effort to better understand current issues with adult ADHD assessment, this study examined the relationship between symptoms, impairment, and executive functioning. Results indicate that among individuals who screened negative for ADHD, those higher in executive function reported experiencing significantly less impairment than those lower in executive function. Executive function was shown to have a negative relationship with impairment and ADHD symptomology was shown to have a positive relationship with impairment. Additionally, impairment was significantly predicted by ADHD symptoms and executive function, and there was a significant interaction between executive function and ADHD symptoms in predicting impairment. Understanding the relationship between executive function, ADHD symptoms, and impairment is critically important in better understanding adult ADHD.

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