Advisor

Olinzock, Anthony

Committee Member

Davis, James

Committee Member

Forde, Connie

Committee Member

Wiseman, William

Date of Degree

1-1-2011

Document Type

Dissertation - Open Access

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Abstract

This study was the first attempt to evaluate the college’s career/technical current advising practices. The purpose of this study was to investigate career/technical students’ satisfaction with academic advising at a rural community college and to investigate whether there were any relationships between students’ satisfaction and various demographic characteristics. The study also investigated students’ impressions of the academic advisors and whether there were any relationships between students’ impressions and various demographic characteristics. The researcher purchased the Survey of Academic Advising, Copyright 1997, from ACT, Inc. The Survey of Academic Advising was developed by the Evaluation Survey Service (ESS) and ACT and was used to measure students’ satisfaction and impressions. Students were most satisfied with four items: scheduling, registration, academic progress, and drop/add procedures. Female participants were more satisfied than male students. Married and unmarried participants were more satisfied than separated participants. Participants who were part-time enrollees were more satisfied than those who were enrolled as full-time students. The participants in this study had high or very high impressions of their advisors. The participants considered their advisors to be easy to talk to, helpful, and effective. They also thought that the advisors had a good sense of humor. Female participants tended to rate their impressions of their academic advisors higher than the male participants, and 18 year old participants tended to rate their impressions of their academic advisors higher than those participants older than 18. Part-time students tended to rate their impressions of their academic advisors higher than full-time students. Finally, those participants who worked 1-10 hours per week tended to rate their impressions of their advisors higher than participants who worked more than 10 hours per week and those who were unemployed.

URI

https://hdl.handle.net/11668/19100

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