Advisor

Davis, E. James

Committee Member

Mathews, Jerry

Committee Member

Wiseman, Marty

Committee Member

Stonecypher, Wayne

Date of Degree

5-1-2008

Document Type

Dissertation - Open Access

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

College

College of Education

Abstract

This study was designed to compare the success rates in College Algebra between two groups of students attending a Mississippi community college. Eighty students enrolled in a College Algebra course were taught using traditional instructional techniques, and 70 students received technology-enhanced instruction. This study considered the effects of grade scores on a mathematics-achievement pretest and posttest, student attitudes toward mathematics, time-on-task while using technology during mathematics study, mathematics subscores on the American College Test, and withdrawal rates. Data collected for this study were derived from the official transcripts of students enrolled in spring 2007 College Algebra classes of a Mississippi community college serving as the study site. A total of 150 students participated in the study. Statistical analysis included t tests, chi-square tests, Pearson product-moment correlations, and analysis of covariance to examine relationships between the two groups of students. The results indicate that the students who received College Algebra instruction via technology-based methods learned equally as well as the students who received the same instruction via traditional methods. The findings also indicate that the students who participated in the traditional College Algebra course had improved attitudes toward mathematics upon completion of the semester. With regard to those who participated in the technology-based College Algebra course, the amount of time devoted to technology use during mathematics study did not correlate to their final grades (i.e., grades were not higher as this expenditure of time increased).

URI

https://hdl.handle.net/11668/15097

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