Advisor

Gordon, Jason S.

Committee Member

Willis, John L.

Committee Member

Grala, Robert K.

Committee Member

Grado, Stephen C.

Date of Degree

1-1-2018

Document Type

Graduate Thesis - Open Access

Major

Forestry

Degree Name

Master of Science

College

College of Forest Resources

Department

Department of Forestry

Abstract

When restored to full ecological function, longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) forests are among the most diverse forest ecosystems in the world. For the last several decades, substantial amount of efforts has taken place on public land, comparably less work has been accomplished on private lands towards longleaf pine restoration. The overall goal of this research was to examine the factors influencing the application of prescribed fire for ecological restoration on private land. This research employed both qualitative and quantitative method to explore challenges and opportunities for restoring the ecosystem. The survey examined interest among the forest landowners and general public regarding longleaf pine restoration management using prescribed fire. Key informant interviews examined factors associated with the decision making for the use of prescribed fire. Research findings have implications for designing and implementing policy instruments and improving landowners’ decision regarding processes.

URI

https://hdl.handle.net/11668/17595

Comments

nonindustrial private forest landowners||restoration||prescribed fire||Longleaf pine

Share

COinS