Theses and Dissertations

Author

Yuan Tan

Issuing Body

Mississippi State University

Advisor

Fan, Zhaofei.

Committee Member

Munn, Ian A.

Committee Member

Parker, Robert C.

Date of Degree

1-1-2011

Document Type

Graduate Thesis - Open Access

Major

Forestry

Degree Name

Master of Science

College

College of Forest Resources

Department

Department of Forestry

Abstract

Former researches provide evidence that invasive species could alter ecosystem’s components, threaten native species and cause economic losses in southern forest lands. The objective of the project is to explore significant driving factors and develop geospatial models for monitoring, predicting and mapping the extent and conditions of major invasive species. In the study area, 16 invasive species were classified into four groups: regionally spreading species, regionally establishing species, locally spreading species and regionally colonizing species by population size and spatial characteristics. According to local Moran’s I, spatial autocorrelation existed in 16 invasive species. Autologistic model and simultaneous autoregressive model were employed to explore the relationships between spatial distribution and a set of indentified variables for Chinese privet, kudzu, Nepalese browntop and tallow tree at plot and county levels. The project showed that human-caused disturbances and forest types were significantly related to the spatial distribution of four invasive species in different scales.

URI

https://hdl.handle.net/11668/16578

Comments

simultaneous autoregressive model||disturbance||forest types||autologistic model||invasive species

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