Theses and Dissertations

Issuing Body

Mississippi State University

Advisor

Diehl, Susan V.

Committee Member

Baird, Richard E.

Committee Member

Borazjani, Abdolhamid

Date of Degree

1-1-2015

Document Type

Graduate Thesis - Open Access

Major

Forest Products

Degree Name

Master of Science

College

College of Forest Resources

Department

Department of Sustainable Bioproducts

Abstract

The movement of the exotic and destructive plant pathogen Phytophthora ramorum into unquarantined areas via the plant nursery trade provides a potential outlet for transmission into eastern United States forests. A two-year survey of Phytophthora species in a forest adjacent to an ornamental plant nursery in Mississippi isolated P. ramorum 20 times from water and once from vegetation, with an additional detection of 14 Phytophthora species and one provisional species. Isolates were recovered from soil, water, and vegetation using baiting and filtering techniques, and verified by their DNA through Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) followed by genomic sequencing. This study confirms the ability of P. ramorum to sustain itself in Mississippi, although disease progression appears to be inhibited by the relatively small window of favorable environmental conditions.

URI

https://hdl.handle.net/11668/18644

Comments

sporangia||chlamydospores||dissemination||soilborne||waterborne||forest pathology||regulations||Sudden Oak Death

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