Theses and Dissertations

Issuing Body

Mississippi State University

Advisor

Okojie, Mabel CPO

Committee Member

Olinzock, Anthony A.

Committee Member

Forde, Connie M.

Committee Member

Davis, James E.

Date of Degree

1-1-2017

Document Type

Dissertation - Open Access

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Abstract

The study investigated the antecedents to disposition to trust with regard to the Accelerated Reader program. The areas considered were teachers’ experience, teachers’ peer experience, teachers’ peer support, gender, and age. The population for this study consisted of teachers who used Accelerated Reader from four school districts in Louisiana. The total number of teachers who were given the survey was 417, and the number of teachers who completed the survey was 301, resulting in a response rate of 72.2%. In this study, 6 research questions were addressed. The first question asked whether a statistically significant relationship exists between teachers’ experience in using electronic education tools and their disposition to trust Accelerated Reader technology to facilitate reading instruction. The second question asked if a statistically significant relationship exists between teachers’ peer experience and their disposition to trust Accelerated Reader software technology to improve reading instruction. The third question asked if a statistically significant relationship exists between teachers’ peer support and their disposition to trust that Accelerated Reader software technology improves reading instruction. The fourth question asked if a relationship exists between teachers’ gender and their disposition to trust that the Accelerated Reader technology will improve reading instruction. The fifth research question asked if a statistically significant relationship exists between teachers’ age and their disposition to trust that the Accelerated Reader technology will improve reading instruction. Finally, the sixth research question asked if teachers trust that Accelerated Reader technology is perceived as effective in helping to improve reading instruction. The results found that teachers’ experience, teachers’ peer experience, teachers’ peer support, and gender were all antecedents that had meaningful statistical relationships with disposition to trust. Gender was found to affect only 1% of the overall variance of disposition to trust when all five variables were examined together; however, findings indicated that females had less disposition to trust than males. Multiple age brackets were found to be insignificant.

URI

https://hdl.handle.net/11668/20036

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