Theses and Dissertations

Issuing Body

Mississippi State University

Advisor

Burroughs, Susie

Committee Member

Hopper, Missy

Committee Member

Watson, Joshua

Committee Member

Brenner, Devon

Date of Degree

1-1-2010

Document Type

Dissertation - Open Access

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

College

College of Education

Abstract

The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to compare the effects of literature instruction using traditional methods to literature instruction using Reading Apprenticeship (RA) to determine if outcomes of attitude and achievement of students enrolled in World Literature courses are changed. Participants included 104 students from 1 junior college in a southeastern state. Of these 104 students, 68 were taught using a traditional method of instruction, and 36 were taught using the RA method of instruction. Students were administered the Rhody Secondary Reading Attitude Survey to determine attitude scores at the beginning of the semester and attitude scores at the end of the semester. In addition, the Accuplacer-Reading Comprehension Test was administered to assess students‘ reading achievement at both the beginning of the semester and at the end of the semester. To analyze the data, a repeated-measures MANOVA was used to determine if statistically significant differences were present in students‘ attitudes and achievement scores based on instruction type. Also, the repeated measures MANOVA was used to determine if there was an interaction between attitude and achievement scores. After analyzing the data that was collected, the results indicated a statistically significant difference between the attitude scores of students taught literature using traditional instruction and students taught literature using RA instruction. The attitudes of students who were taught World Literature through traditional instructional methods experienced little change, and the attitudes of students who were taught World Literature using the RA method significantly increased. The results of the achievement tests and the interaction were not statistically significant.

URI

https://hdl.handle.net/11668/20045

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