Theses and Dissertations

Author

Nathan Horn

Issuing Body

Mississippi State University

Advisor

Giesen, James

Committee Member

Jason Phillips, Jason

Committee Member

Mark Hersey, Mark

Date of Degree

5-1-2009

Document Type

Graduate Thesis - Open Access

Major

History

Degree Name

Master of Arts

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of History

Abstract

At the time of its construction (1971-1985), the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway was a highly scrutinized public works project, but the years after its construction have remained largely unexplored. Research in the John C. Stennis Collection, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway Development Authority archives, and local newspapers, revealed that despite developers’ promise the waterway’s economic impact failed to live up to expectations, while its environmental influence more than exceeded them. Though rural southerners failed to benefit economically from the waterway, they embraced the environmental changes forced upon the project by the National Environmental Policy Act. Built as a promise of economic development, the Tenn-Tom offers a model of how economics and environmental forces intersected within the rural South. The waterway’s history as an economic and environmental force demands a reconsideration of the role of public works projects in southern environmental history.

URI

https://hdl.handle.net/11668/15217

Share

COinS